Speaker Bios

Bilyea Ted Bilyea retired in 2005 as Executive Vice-President, Maple Leaf Foods Inc., having spent a very successful 35 years with the same company. Mr. Bilyea is an Agri-food consultant specializing in innovation with clients in both private and public sector.

Mr. Bilyea holds a B.A. (Hons.) and an M.A. in International Relations from York University. He is a member of the board of Paterson Global Foods Inc., Afexa Life Sciences Inc. and the Alberta Livestock and Meat Agency. Ted chairs the Science Advisory Board of Agriculture & Agri-food Canada, and is a member of the Board of PrioNet Canada, Canadian Agri-food Policy Institute and George Morris Centre, where he also is a fellow. Mr. Bilyea was the 2010 recipient of the H.R. MacMillan Laureate in Agriculture from the University of Guelph.

Presentation Overview

Canada with a population less than California and an enormous agricultural land base of 1.3 hectares per person compared to the U.S.A. half a hectare per person has always had to focus on international markets. Without competitive access and focused strategic marketing efforts a large part of our land base becomes less economic. Canadian agri-food companies, particularly processed food and beverage companies are losing ground in terms of global competitiveness and global reach. Discussions with a number of C.E.O.s of Canadian and multinational food companies operating in Canada suggest a range of drivers for declining global reach for example, strategic focus, regional mandates, leadership, declining CAPEX, scale, input cost and loss of innovation capacity. Can Canadian food companies be global players?

Return to Agenda


boall

Peter Boxall is currently Professor of Environmental and Resource Economics in the Department of Rural Economy at the University of Alberta. His principal research interests lie in the economic valuation of changes in environmental quality. His most recent research programme has involved agri-environmental issues, such as BMP adoption in agriculture for environmental improvements and the economics costs and benefits of wetland drainage and restoration. He is currently involved in examining market based approaches to increasing the provision of ecosystem services such as procurement auctions and offset programs for water quality improvements. He is the network leader of LEARN – Linking Environment and Agriculture Research Network – a national policy research network funded by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

 

Return to Agenda


Carter

Colin Carter is Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California, Davis and Director of the University of California’s Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics. Colin was born and raised on a farm in Alberta, Canada. After completing a B.A. and M.Sc. at the University of Alberta, he obtained a Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from the University of California, Berkeley in 1980. Colin has published widely in the areas of international trade, agricultural policy, futures and commodity markets, the economics of China's agriculture, and the economics of biotechnology adoption in agriculture. Colin Carter was named Fellow of the American Agricultural Economics Association in 2000 in recognition of his many contributions to the field of agricultural economics.

Presentation Overview

This talk focuses on the role of emerging markets in global agricultural trade. Important factors shaping this trade and Canada’s trade performance in these markets will be highlighted. Challenges and opportunities posed by emerging markets and their agricultural trade will be identified with particular relevance to Canada.

Return to Agenda


Caswell

Julie Caswell is Professor in the Department of Resource Economics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Her research focuses on understanding the operation of domestic and international food systems, with particular interest in the economics of food quality and labeling, especially for safety and nutrition, and international trade. Dr. Caswell was elected Fellow of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association (AAEA) and she is currently President-Elect of AAEA. Dr. Caswell held a Fulbright Distinguished Lectureship at the University of Tuscia in Viterbo, Italy for April-June 2009. Dr. Caswell has served on the several National Academies committees, incluidng chairing the Committee on Examination of the Adequacy of Food Resources and SNAP. Dr. Caswell received her PhD jointly in Agricultural Economics and Economics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Presentation Overview

Public (regulatory) and private food quality standards are competitors with or complements of each other. Like any other market, this one has an industrial organization characterized by basic conditions, market structure, and different types of conduct. Together these aspects of the industrial organization of the market for quality certification are affecting the international trade competitiveness of the Canadian agricultural sector.

Return to Agenda


cranfield

John Cranfield is a Professor in the Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of Guelph. He has a B.Sc. and M.Sc. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Guelph and a Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from Purdue University. John's research focuses on the economics of consumer demand for food and food products; innovation in the agri-food and biotechnology sectors; and economic history.

 

 

Return to Agenda


Fulton

Murray Fulton is a Professor and graduate chair at the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School, University of Saskatchewan. He is the co-authors of Canadian Agricultural Policy and Prairie Agriculture, and he paid particular attention to the changes that are occurring in agriculture and the response of organizations – including agricultural co-operatives – to these changes. His current research is focused on executive compensation in the public and quasi-public sectors, governance, and in behavioural economics and its application to business strategy and public policy formation.

Presentation Overview

The removal of the single-desk selling powers of the CWB ushers in a new economic environment for Canada's grain economy. While marketing freedom has disappeared as a policy issue, other issues are likely to emerge, many of which are linked to trade. Sector-specific issues include foreclosure concerns regarding elevator access (particularly at port position), railway service levels and consumer acceptance of genetically modified wheat, while economy-wide issues include exchange rate pressures, input price levels (e.g., energy, fertilizer, chemicals), and labour supply.

 

Return to Agenda


Gale

Heather Gale has been working with Canada's horticultural industry since 2000 and is the National Program Manager for the CanadaGAP Food Safety Program for Fresh Fruit and Vegetables. Heather has served as Chair of the Food Safety Committee for the International Federation for Produce Standards, and is a member of the Global Food Safety Initiative’s Technical Working Group. She is a Director for the national primary production sector on the Board of the Canadian Supply Chain Food Safety Coalition. Her work history includes project management, communications and several years of experience working on a fruit and vegetable farm. She graduated with an M.A. from the University of Ottawa in 1994.

Presentation Overview

The CanadaGAP™ Program is an example of a private standard that has served to enhance market access for companies selling fresh fruits and vegetables to buyers domestically and internationally. Increasingly, these business-to-business assurance systems are demanded by customers as a pre-requisite to trade.

Return to Agenda


Geddes Earl Geddes attended the Faculty of Agriculture at the University of Manitoba, then returned to the family farm for 24 years. The farm focused on purebred Charolais beef cattle, cereal grain and oilseed production. He is a former President of Keystone Agricultural Producers, Canadian Federation of Agriculture executive member, President of the Manitoba Beef Cattle Performance Association, and member on the National Beef Cattle Advisory Committee and the Manitoba Charolais Association as well as several national agricultural organizations and advisory bodies.

Earl joined the Canadian Wheat Board in 1995 working in the area of international market development which gave him the opportunity to travel extensively in order to promote Canadian field crops as food and feed ingredients. Earl became the Executive Director of the Canadian International Grains Institute (CIGI) in September 2009 where he leads a team of technical and program professionals focused on supporting the Canadian field crop industry in their global technical export market activities.

Presentation Overview

Constant and rapid change would best describe the current grain market environment in Canada. The removal of a monopoly seller of wheat, durum and barley has had a significant impact on all players in the grain system and some more than others. At the same time forces greater than the removal of the Canadian Wheat Board are having equally significant impacts on the grain economy. We will explore what changed with Bill C-18 the Marketing Freedom for Grain Farmers Act, what didn’t change , what we should be watching for the in the short term and over a longer period of adjustment. As well we will take a look at some of the key drivers that will impact the grain economy as Canada steps up with a new marketing environment to capture the opportunities that global shifts are creating.

Return to Agenda


Gervais

J.P. Gervais is the Chief Agricultural Economist at Farm Credit Canada (FCC). Prior to joining FCC, he was a Professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics at North Carolina State. He also taught in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Laval University. J.P. is currently President-elect of the Canadian Agricultural Economics Society. He obtained his Ph.D. in economics from Iowa State University in 1999.

 

 

 

Return to Agenda


Gifford

Mike Gifford served as Canada's chief agricultural trade negotiator and senior agricultural trade advisor to the ministers for agriculture and trade for many years. In this capacity he was responsible for the agricultural chapters of the Canada-US and NAFTA trade agreements and was Canada's chief agricultural trade negotiator throughout the Uruguay Round of GATT negotiations. Since retiring from the Public Service he has acted as a trade policy advisor to federal and provincial governments and a number of Canadian agri-business firms. He also has been involved in trade policy capacity building projects in China, Egypt and Africa as well as serving on a WTO trade dispute panel.

Presentation Overview

Major changes in dairy status quo will only come from external pressure - no political appetite for unilateral reform. However, if the EU and US continue to be defensive on dairy, Canada will not have to make dramatic changes in dairy policy.

Return to Agenda


Ellen Goddard is Cooperative Chair in Agricultural Marketing and Business, University of Alberta. She came to Alberta from a position as National Australia Bank Professor of Agribusiness and Associate Dean, Coursework, at the Institute of Land and Food Resources, the University of Melbourne. Prior to that Australian appointment Ellen Goddard worked in the Department of Agricultural Economics at the University of Guelph. Over the past 20 years Professor Goddard’s research has been focused on economic modeling of domestic and international markets for food products (particularly meat) for policy analysis purposes. Current research includes various aspects of food marketing including consumer response to food safety incidents, consumer interest in labels, demand for credence attributes, traceability and certification. She also currently leads a national policy research network for Agriculture and Agri-food Canada in Consumer and Market Demand for Food.

Return to Agenda


Grant

Jason Grant is an assistant professor in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics at Virginia Tech. He obtained his M.Sc. degree in the Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of Guelph and a Ph.D in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Purdue University. His research focuses on international trade and policy. He maintains an active interest in multilateral trade negotiations, bilateral and regional trade agreements, tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade, and trade disputes. His research has been published in the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, the Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Economics, the Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics, and the Journal of International Law and Trade Policy.

Presentation Overview

Preferential trade agreements (PTAs) are a ubiquitous feature of the global trading system. This discussion will draw on a rich body of empirical work investigating the subject of PTAs, their potential benefits for Canada’s agri-food trade, and how they are affecting relative preferential margins.

Return to Agenda


Gray

Richard Gray is a Professor in the Department of Bioresources Policy, Business and Economics at the University of Saskatchewan. His career began in 1981, working as market analyst with the provincial government while he also operated the family farm at Indian Head. He joined the University in 1990 after receiving a Ph.D. from the University of California Berkeley. Since then, he has supervised over two dozen graduate students and has studied a wide range of agricultural policy issues. He is a network leader for the Canadian Agricultural Innovation and Regulation Network (CAIRN) as well as a Fellow and former President of the Canadian Agricultural Economics Society.

 

Return to Agenda


Hedley Douglas Hedley left the federal government as Assistant Deputy Minister in Agriculture and Agri-food Canada in 2004. He spent 29 years with AAFC working on all aspects of agricultural and food policy and programs in the Department. He also spent over 13 years with the Rockefeller Foundation and Winrock International as a scholar, visiting professor and project leader in several countries including USA, Colombia, Nigeria and Indonesia. He serves as Executive Director for the Canadian Faculties of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, as well as working on projects for governments, industry and academia in North America.

He is a Fellow of the International Association of Agricultural Economists, and was founding editor of the journal ‘Agricultural Economics’ for the organization. He is also a Fellow of the Canadian Agricultural Economics Society.

Presentation Overview

Canada’s trade experience following CUSTA/NAFTA and the WTO showed early positive signs and more recently some worrying trends. While “research” appears to be doing well, innovation is certainly lagging. The issue is the role that research and innovation policy must play in the face of new and expanded trade agreements.

Return to Agenda


Hobbs Jill Hobbs is a Professor in the Department of Bioresource Policy, Business & Economics at the University of Saskatchewa. Her research interests encompass food economics and supply chain economics and she has published widely on topics such as the economics of food safety, quality assurance and traceability, changing supply chain relationships in the agri-food sector, and consumer attitudes toward new food quality attributes.

Presentation Overview

The impact on international trade of both public and private standards will be discussed. This includes sanitary and phytosanitary regulations, as well as technical barriers to trade such as labelling requirements. The question of whether private standards enhance or inhibit trade flows will be explored. The scope and stringency of both public and private standards is increasing, with important implications for the future trajectory of the agriculture and food industry.

Return to Agenda


Hope

Dave Hope served within the Ontario agricultural ministry in several assistant deputy minister roles, most recently as ADM of food safety and environment. He was previously chairman of the provincial supervisory agency responsible for the marketing boards within the province. He also spent almost ten years as the policy director responsible for farm income programming and represented the province on federal/provincial negotiations. He also spent time at the University of Guelph as Senior Fellow - Agricultural Policy.

Presentation Overview

In Canada, with its shared federal/provincial jurisdiction for agriculture, the policies and programs supported by the provinces are important. While the participation of more than eleven governments increases the complexity of program changes it also provides an opportunity for compromise and diffuses the impact of stakeholders. The impact of programs on potential trade issues is only one of many important considerations that impact this process.

Return to Agenda


Kerr

William Kerr is a University Distinguished Chair at the University of Saskatchewan where he is a Professor in the Department of Bioresource Policy, Business and Economics. He is an agricultural economist whose research focuses on international trade policy issues in the agri-food sector. He has over 300 academic publications including 20 books. Recent titles include the Handbook on International Trade Policy and Conflict, Chaos and Confusion – The Crisis in the International Trading System. He is the editor of the Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Agricultural Economics Society.

Presentation Overview

The impact on international trade of both public and private standards will be discussed. This includes sanitary and phytosanitary regulations, as well as technical barriers to trade such as labelling requirements. The question of whether private standards enhance or inhibit trade flows will be explored. The scope and stringency of both public and private standards is increasing, with important implications for the future trajectory of the agriculture and food industry.

Return to Agenda


Lrue

Bruno Larue is Professor and Canada Rsearch Chair in International Agri-Food Trade at Laval University and Director of the Center for Research on the Economics of Agri-food (CREA). Over the years, he has held various leadership roles including editor of the Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics, President of the Canadian Agricultural Economics Society, and currently as lead of the Structure and Performance of Agriculture and Agri-products Industries (SPAA) Research Network. His areas of specialization are International Trade, Industrial Organization, Consumer Economics and Production/Environmental Economics.

 

Return to Agenda


Masswohl

John Masswohl has led the CCA's government relations and international trade activities in Ottawa since 2004. He previously spent 14 years with the Federal Government including a stint as Agriculture Trade Counsellor at the Canadian Embassy in Washington D.C. and several years involved in gaining access for Canadian exporters to overseas markets.


He is originally from the Niagara region and holds an Honours Business degree from Wilfrid Laurier University. He and his wife Susan have two children.

Presentation Overview

It seems that every year there is a new challenge for Canada’s beef producers. The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association is constantly pursuing policies that can increase producer revenues and decrease costs.

Return to Agenda


Meilke

Karl Meilke is Ontario Agriculture College Professor Emeritus of Food, Agriculture and Resource Economics at the University of Guelph. Dr. Meilke was reared on a wheat and cattle ranch and joined the University of Guelph in 1973 following completion of a degree in Agricultural and Applied Economics at the University of Minnesota. He is the Director of the Canadian Agricultural Trade Policy Research Network, a former Chair of the International Agricultural Trade Policy Research Consortium and a Fellow of the Canadian Agricultural Economics Society.

 

 

Return to Agenda


Meredith

Greg Meredith is currently Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) for Strategic Policy at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC). He has also held positions as ADM Programs and ADM Communications and Consultations in Agriculture. Prior to joining AAFC, Mr. Meredith held a variety of positions in the Department of Foreign Affairs, Industry Canada and in the federal intelligence community.

 

 

 

Return to Agenda


Orden

David Orden is professor and director of the Global Issues Initiative (GII), Institute for Society, Culture and Environment (ISCE), Virginia Tech, and senior research fellow, at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). His research and policy interests are in the economics and political economy of domestic support programs, international trade negotiations, and technical barriers to trade. He has recently co-edited WTO Disciplines on Agricultural Support: Seeking a Fair Basis for Trade (with David Blandford and Tim Josling, Cambridge University Press, 2011).

Presentation Overview

Constraints on distortionary agricultural domestic support remain lax in the absence of a new WTO Doha Round agreement. In both the US and EU, agricultural support policy is under review with new options being devised. Likewise, support for agriculture has increased in key emerging economies. This presentation reviews these developments and their implications for trade and future trade negotiations.

Return to Agenda


Price Ray Price was raised on a mixed family farm near Acme, AB. After attending college he returned to the farm and worked in every area of the pork business from cleaning pig pens to sales and finance. Ray is now President of the Sunterra Group which includes pig and crop production, Sunterra Meats pork processing facility, and Sunterra Markets retail foods.

Ray is currently the Chairman of the Board of the Canadian Meat Council, a director of Sunterra, and vice-chair of Alberta Innovates-Biosolutions. He has also served on several other industry and corporate boards including, the George Morris Centre, the Government of Canada Council of Science and Technology Advisors, the Prairie Swine Research Centre, and Careers the Next Generation.

Ray and his wife Peggy have 5 daughters and continue to live on a farm near Acme.

Presentation Overview

Canada’s agriculture and meat industry requires access to export markets in order for it to be sustainable and successful. Regional trade agreements can give Canada’s meat industry an edge on competitors, or make markets disappear, depending on their quality. Canada has a unique opportunity to make significant progress on market access through the current series of negotiations with Japan, Korea, the E.U. and the Trans Pacific Partnership.

Return to Agenda


Rice

Martin Rice was born and raised in the rural area of the Niagara Peninsula in Ontario. He attended the University of Guelph where he obtained a B.A. (1974) in Economics and a Master of Science (1978) in Agricultural Economics. Upon graduation, he joined the Canadian Federation of Agriculture as an economist where he worked for both general and commodity interests, including dairy and pork. Martin has served as chief staff officer of the Canadian Pork Council since 1987.

Presentation Overview

Canada has the potential to significantly increase its agricultural production and exports. However, the industry must be able to adapt to a global trading environment characterized by sharp swings in such critical factors of competition as exchange rates as well as unforeseen changes in the political environment in importing countries which can have a major impact on conditions of export access to those markets. To achieve sustainable success as an agri-food exporter, Canada needs to have a wide diversity of country market opportunities that avoid potentially dangerous overreliance upon one or two markets. Given that world trade talks, the ‘Doha Round’, are stalled, the next best alternative, bilateral and regional trade agreements become the means to achieving that all-important diversification. Many of these opportunities will be with emerging country markets with whom Canada has just begun to develop its trade linkages.

Return to Agenda


Ruest Jean-Marc Ruest graduated from St. Boniface College with a Bachelor of Arts degree (political science) in 1990. He obtained his Bachelor of Law degree in 1993 from the University of Ottawa and his Master of Law degree (International Commercial Law) from Cambridge University in 1994.

Jean-Marc was called to the Bars of Ontario and Manitoba in 1996 and joined Great-West Life as in-house counsel. He subsequently joined the law firm of Fillmore Riley in Winnipeg where he practiced primarily in the areas of civil and commercial litigation, employment and labour law. Jean-Marc joined Richardson International Limited in 2002 and is currently Richardson’s Vice-President, Corporate Affairs and General Counsel. In this role, he manages all legal affairs for Richardson International and its subsidiaries. He is also responsible for general corporate affairs and corporate communications.

Jean-Marc has been actively involved in Canadian agricultural policy matters as a member of the Western Grain Elevators Association Management Committee and as current Chairman of the Canada Grains Council. He is also active in numerous community associations, including the St. Boniface College (Capital Campaign Cabinet member), the St. Boniface Hospital (Board of Directors) and the United Way of Winnipeg (Major Donor Cabinet).

Presentation Overview

Canada's grain industry is undergoing a significant regulatory and commercial transformation. The magnitude and speed of these changes are of historic proportions. How will industry participants position themselves to avoid pitfalls and, more importantly, take full advantage of new opportunities?

Return to Agenda


Schott

Jeffrey Schott is a Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics working on international trade policy and economic sanctions. Mr. Schott has taught at Princeton University (1994) and at Georgetown University (1986-88). Previously, he was a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (1982-83) and an official of the US Treasury Department (1974-1982). He is a member of the Trade and Environment Policy Advisory Committee for the US Trade Representative; the Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy of the US Department of State; and the Advisory Council of the Economics Department of Washington University in St. Louis. He has authored several books; recent titles include NAFTA and Climate Change (2011); Figuring Out the Doha Round (2010); Reengaging Egypt: Options for US-Egypt Economic Relations (2010); Economic Sanctions Reconsidered (3rd ed., 2007); and NAFTA Revisited: Achievements and Challenges (2005).

Presentation Overview

The presentation will assess prospects for the Trans-Pacific Partnership, key agricultural issues in the negotiations, and implications for broader regional integration and for new multilateral trade initiatives.

Return to Agenda


Whalley John Whalley is Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Western Ontario. He obtained his PhD from Yale University in 1973 and began teaching at the University of Western Ontario in 1976. He is also Director for the Centre for the Study of International Economic Relations and a Distinguished Fellow in the Centre for International Governance Innovation. He was awarded the Hellmuth Prize for Lifetime Research Achievement in 2009 and was a 2012-recipient of one of five Canada Council for the Arts Killam Prizes.

He is Fellow the Royal Society of Canada, The Econometric Society and a foreign member of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences. He is co-editor of CESifo Economic Studies and a former joint managing editor of The World Economy.

Presentation Overview

This presentation takes stocks of regional trade agreements in the trading system as of 2012, emphasizing in past development since the 2008 crisis. The number of notifications to the WTO continues to grow and at a higher rate, although some notifications are changes to existing agreements. The growth is heavily in small to small country agreements. Their trade impacts are discussed, as well as agriculture provisions. These are relatively few, limited in the main, to tariff reductions and special agriculture safeguard mechanisms.

Return to Agenda


 

 

Return to top Top of Page

 

© Canadian Agricultural Innovation and Regulation Network 2012. All rights reserved.
CAIRN, c/o Department of Bioresource Policy, Business and Economics, 51 Campus Drive,
University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8 Canada
Email us!
Conference Overview
Agenda
Speakers
Register
Accommodations
Brochure
Research Posters
Contact Us